Skip to main content

About your Search

20130101
20130131
STATION
CSPAN 23
KQED (PBS) 17
CNNW 15
MSNBCW 13
CSPAN2 9
KRCB (PBS) 9
CNN 8
WHUT (Howard University Television) 8
WETA 7
MSNBC 5
WJZ (CBS) 3
FBC 2
LINKTV 2
KPIX (CBS) 1
( more )
LANGUAGE
English 159
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 159 (some duplicates have been removed)
to pakistan's foreign minister. according to one international ranking, pakistan ranks as the 34th most corrupt country in the world. it is not surprising that people are protesting. >> corruption that is a challenge in pakistan, like in many other countries. we are doing whatever we can and we intend to do more. we think that is very different than the type of person you are talking about, the person that has absolutely no credentials. staying for the last six years or more in canada. they are challenging pakistan and the fears of 180 million people. challenging the system or we have paid the price to put that in place in pakistan. >> you are talking about the clerics that have called on people to protest. but we talked to you about relations between washington and islamabad. one of the sticking points have been u.s. drone strikes within pakistan. there have been seven droned strikes within the past few weeks. have you come to the conclusion that these drones strikes are useful for pakistan? >> absolutely not. the point has been made for the last many years that they would be productiv
's influential board and has served as a senior advisor as recently as 2011 for afghanistan and pakistan. ladies and gentlemen, dean vali nasr. [cheers and applause] now, when you think of provocative conversation on the big foreign policy challenge of the day you have to think about our next debater. his program on cnn is seen in over 200 countries worldwide but he's anything but a talking head on tv. he writes a column for "the washington post" and is the edit or "time" magazine. please welcome back to the munk debate stage journalist fareed zakaria. [cheers and applause] now we're moments from getting our debate under way but before we hear opening statements, once again, i need this audience assist answer to make sure our debaters stay on time in terms of their opening and closing remark and we move forward as a debate together. so you will see this countdown clock, this clock appear. when it reaches zero applaud. this will let our debaters know that their time is over for their opening and closing statements. before we kick off the debate let's see how the 3,000 people gathered today voted
after recent problems. boeing maintains it is safe to fly. thousands of protesters in front of pakistan's government, the cleric is holding talks with the government. as of the ruling coalition are negotiating with him after he threatened further action. he wants the government to resign. there's no sign the prime minister will heed his call. the anti-corruption chief of pakistan has been depending the prime minister at the supreme court. he says and ordered to arrest the prime minister is flawed. kamal, i don't know if you have been watching the footage of the pakistani foreign minister is saying that khadri is nobody. so why is the government engaging in talks with him? >> as you said, who is he? many people in pakistan say if he were so insignificant, how is it that he has brought the government to its knees? some parts of the city are paralyzed. people wanting to march on parliament. he was speaking from inside his bulletproof container, sipping hot coffee while is the ots, women and children, were sitting out in the pounding rain. that's when he gave the ultimatum, saying that he w
against al qaeda in pakistan, afghanistan, and other places in the world. i think it is incumbent on us in the senate to make sure we have a framework for when and how we're going to approve the use of drones. i do think they are an important tool in our toolkit to fight back against islamic extremists and to take action against folks who have demonstrated to be a real threat to the united states and our regional allies. >> thank you very much for joining us from capitol hill tonight. >> thank you. >> in other news now, senior officials say that leon panetta, the defense secretary, decided to lift a ban about women in combat. it will make available hundreds of thousands of jobs. women are part of the active military personnel in america. and a suicide bombing at a mosque at the capital of baghdad. explosives inside the mosque south of kirkuk. a funeral was taking place at the time of the attack. russia says it is not planning large-scale evacuation of its citizens from syria despite the crisis there. many were flown back to moscow on monday. there are tens of thousands of russian citize
as a senior advisor recently as 2011 for afghanistan and pakistan to the late richard holbrook, former munk bedator. now, when you think of provocktiff conversation on the big foreign policy challenges of the day you have to think about our next debator. his flagship global affairs program on cnn is seen in over 200 countries worldwide. but he is anything but a talking head on cable tv. he writes a highly respected column for the "washington post" and is the editor at large of time magazine. his numerous best-selling books include the post american world and the future of freedom. now, we are just moments from getting our debate under way but before we hear opening statements once again i am going to need this audience's assistance as the night goes on to make sure our debators stay on time in terms of their opening and closing remarks and that we move forward as a debate together. so you will see this countdown clock appear when it reaches 0 applaud this will let our debators know that their time is over for their opening and closing statements. and finally before we kick off the debate le
personally intervened to resolve a diplomatic crises and difficult places from pakistan and afghanistan to egypt and sudan. and i really look forward to working with you on some of the challenging issues as it faces the country in the world but we start back to something and number of senators have referred to in your opening statement which you said. i just want to say i've been deeply encouraged by your response to senator shaheen's comments and senator rubio. we are sadly foreign commercial service woefully underrepresented and wherever opportunity to advocate for american business and american values and as you know i chaired to the hearings on this. we are about to come out with a report from the subcommittee and i would be interested as the first of my several questions and how you see has successfully competing with china which has a rapidly growing footprint across africa in both economic opportunities and in our differing values agenda and what that makes doing for and how you would address that as secretary e and senator coons were a terrific team with respect to africa and i
strikes in a number of countries including somalia, pakistan, afghanistan, and yemen. the inquiry will look at 25 separate from strikes including a u.s. attack in pakistan in 2011 where up to 40 civilians are reported to have been killed. in syria today, war planes continued to bomb rubble-held areas near the capital as president assad was shown on television and attending a mosque service to mark the birthday of the prophet. every day, thousands of refugees to flee the violence. the strain on those trying to shelter them is enormous. we have been to a camp in jordan. >> small figures and a vast crisis. every night now, they come in their thousands. most are women and children, terrorized by war. for the children, how frightening is it? >> they keep screaming. they cannot sleep. they cry all the time. >> in the distance and in the country behind them, smoke rises from an explosion. on this side of the border, they meet soldiers to try to help, not kill. >> at each border crossing, or forces are there to receive them. we take them somewhere south, to restore their sense of security
organizations in pakistan's tribal areas who have argued from their perspective on the ground, civilian casualties are rather minimal. but other than some sporadic conversations i've had with people in the tribal areas, i think the data we have publicly is limited. >> brown: what does your data show, or people you talk to show? >> two things. one is tomorrow the united nations is going to announce it's appointing a special investigator into civilian deaths by drones, and through this targeted killing program. so we should be able to get some of the real facts through this u.n. investigation. it's ridiculous that the united states itself hasn't conducted this kind of investigation. of or disclose its results. but that investigation will be done by the u.n. the second thing is general mcchrystal just earlier this month talks of talked about the drone program and how-- how th the-- the attacks on civilians and the civilian casualties are cause, what he calls a vis viseral reaction of hatred in the affected countries, the very people we're trying to win over to our side. >> brown: that's be
is among eight people killed by a u.s. drone strike in pakistan. as you probably know the obama administration has stepped up the use of drones overseas to target suspected terrorists. president obama's nomination of john brennan to be the next cia director suggests that trend is likely to continue. brennan, a strong proponent of drones as the president's chief counterterrorism advisor. for more on how the u.s. drone program works let's get to chief washington correspondent james rosen. he is live for us at the state department. james? >> reporter: jon, good morning. this program presents a consistent headache for the diplomats in this building and who must frequently contend with complaints from afghan and pakistani officials who say these drones all too often wind up killing innocent civilians instead of terrorists the drone program is one of the national security initiatives that president obama inherited from the bush administration and one which the current commander-in-chief has dramatically expanded. for all his criticism of president bush during the 2008 campaign over hi
, pakistan, and sudan. historians will judged his senate years on his impact on foreign policy much the same way so many people recognized ted kennedy's impact on domestic policy. from his many years in the u.s. senate, he has developed a very personal understanding that we represent not just states or governments, but also people. i once asked john why he loves the senate. he said it is the pride he feels in trying to get things done for people. for three years now, he has been working quietly to help a father from massachusetts, whose two sons were kidnapped and taken to egypt. john even called former president mubarak and had a screaming match with him about it. five times he has been to egypt and every time, colin has been at the top of his list in every meeting. every senator has a colin -- it is what we do. we fight for people back home. as secretary, john will understand that and bend over backwards to help us do that. he will be a terrific bridge from the hill to the administration. i know that john kerry cares deeply about our country and our national security. i know he believes in
against the united states in a country like pakistan and each at, which are large recipients of the public majority that is military, but there is a very powerful sentiment that this evil don't like us. they take our money and burn our flag. luscious cut them off. obviously there's been resolutions and so forth. talk about how you respond to you think the country how to respond to that very powerful sentiment. >> well, the common thread here is the presence of al qaeda and its affiliates in the threat that poses to the world from the standpoint of stability and peaceful transition of government. we are reminded that almost every day and it's a crested that sweeps across the middle of the world, starting in indignation at coming across northern africa and now moving down to the sub-saharan parts of africa. this is a threat that has enormous implications. we've seen ignoring the threat as we did in afghanistan pre-9/11 leads to dire consequences potentially for americans. it is true the american public is more weary, but nevertheless we are reminded every day that works and journalists -- >>
reportedly has decided to exclude cia drone strikes in pakistan from new legal oversight for targeted killings overseas. the washington post reports counter-terrorism adviser and cia-nominee john brennan has signed off on a plan to exempt the drone attacks in pakistan from a list of operations that would be covered under newly enacted rules. areas covered in the so-called play book include the process for adding names to kill lists, the principles for killing u.s. citizens abroad, and the command chain for authorizing cia or u.s. military strikes outside war zones. the exemption of drone strikes in pakistan would allow the cia to continue carrying them without -- tearing them without a legal framework for a to two years. the hostage standoff in a jury of his ended in the deaths of dozens of people, including up to 48 of the captured workers. algerian forces say they recovered at least 25 bodies after storming the militant held gas complex saturday, bringing the confirmed death toll to least 80. witnesses say the hostages were brutally executed. the toll could have been worse as hundre
and successful diplomatic intervention in afghanistan, pakistan, and sedan. -- sudan. historians will be judged his senate years on his impact on foreign policy at much the same way so many people recognized ted kennedy's impact on domestic policy. from his many years in the u.s. senate, he has developed a very personal understanding that we represent not just states or governments, but also people. i want to ask john why he loves the senate. he said it is the pride he feels in trying to get things done for people. for three years now, he has been working quietly to help a father from massachusetts, whose two sons were kidnapped and taken to eject. john even called former president mubarak and had a screaming match with him about it. five times he has been to egypt and every time, colin has been at the top of his list in every meeting. every senator has -- it is what we do. we fight for people back,. as secretary, john will understand that and bend over backwards to help us do that. he will be a terrific bridge from the hill to the administration. i know that john kerry cares deeply about our c
laden and headquartered in pakistan probably matter a lot less now than a few years ago but what you have seen is that as we pit al qaeda in the core area in afghanistan and pakistan it splintered outward and moved outward. and now are you seeing, you know, like a virus trying to find a body in which it can find a weak host. it's moving out and becoming more powerful in places like yemen, somalia, libya, now mali. so it's moving further and further a field and there are so many weak states because this is where terrorists te rt. they take root in failed states there are so many failed states in africa it is not just mali there are a lot of other places and now increasingly in north africa too because of the upheavals that we've seen in the last several years. there's very weak states that cannot resist the incursions of these islamist terrorist groups so we are actually seeing an al qaeda which is morphing and changing an remains very dangerous i think but the danger is taking different forms from what it was when it was more centrally run and tightly controlled out of pakistan. that
, including pakistan. we welcome recent steps that have been taken, and look for more tangible steps, because a stable at future afghanistan is in the interest of not only the afghans and the united states but of the entire region. we reaffirmed the strategic partnership that we signed last year in kabul, an enduring partnership between sovereign nations. this includes deepening ties in trade talks, commerce, , education, and opportunities for all afghans, men and women, boys and girls. this sends a clear message to afghans into the region as afghans stand up they will not stand alone. the united states and the world stands with them. let me close by saying this continues to be a very difficult mission. our forces continue to serve and the tremendous sacrifices every day. the afghan people make significant sacrifices every day. afghan forces will still be growing stronger. we remain vigilant against insider attacks. lasting peace and security will require governments at the ballot that delivers for the afghan people an end to safe havens for al qaeda. this will continue to get our work. make
, pakistan certainly has taken out a whole codry of leadership. what we are seeing now are people who have migrated back to other parts of the world where they came from, primarily, who are, in effect, affiliates. part of the jihadist syndicate, like maghreb uses that name. the fact is, they are terrorists, they are extremists. they have designs on overthrowing existing governments, even these new islamist governments of controlling territory. so although there has been the decimation of core al qaeda in the afghanistan/pakistan region, we do have to contend with the wannabes and affiliates going forward. >> thank you, madam. >> thank you, mr. chairman and thank you, madam secretary for being here and it's great to see you today. you have been, i think, a real and dedicated public servant for this country and your travels around the world as many here have talked about it, the million miles that you have put on and all the countries you visited and i think you've been to many countries where they've never had a secretary of state and i've seen firsthand when i've been to many of these coun
, climbing support for the state department. you have pakistan and afghanistan, with the drawal from afghanistan that will only make it harder, and that has impact on pakistan. china, and russia. leadership in russia, as you know, very, very complicated. where does he look first for support, and, you know, who wants this job? >> i would say the middle east -- the hard thing that you hit on is the challenges for a secretary of state and for the united states generally in foreign policy have not waned. they have probably increased. in libya and benghazi and secretary clinton tried to make this point and senator kerry as well that the funding for all of these things is -- it's a fine it amount of money, and it's shrinking at the moment. the difficulty of a world that remains kredably complex, probably more complex, with our somewhat increasingly limited ability to sort of address every hotspot that we like, it's a very, very difficult challenge for any secretary of state. john kerry or anyone else. we saw it with hillary clinton. yes, she had successes clearly, but she also centeringled
in his home of pakistan with "one more fish" hocking snapper at queens market in london. >> and so you like this? >> i do. feeling it. >> psy says he doesn't want to sing gangnam style anymore. >> instead of what? what's his other hit? >> he has nothing. >> "one pound fish" okay. >>> was it one small fbi for neil armstrong? >> that's one small step for man, one giant leap for mankind. >> a new documentary suggests that armstrong may have lied when he said he ad libed that famous line when he became the first man to step foot on the room. in a recent interview, armstrong's brother claimed that he thought up the famous line months before the july 16th apollo mission and that he was supposed to say a man not just man. >>> some people were shocked when they thought they saw superman flying over the coast. here's jeanne moos. >> he may look like a man of steel but he's actually the man of lightweight foam. actually his top speed is 30 miles an hour. but the sight of superman flying above the california coast was enough to make a cyclist stop and shoot it. the video went viral. and now peopl
countries like pakistan, meet with audiencees, take questions, be very visible. as secretary, she did not have a record of substantial negotiation-- a la henry kissinger, jim baker. it's hard to find things like that on in her record, but on representational side, very strong performance. also in terms of being loyal to president obama. the obama white house was concerned in the beginning, that this superstar, part of team clinton, was going to over-shadow the president and the white house. they were very controlling sometimes in how they methods foreign policy, but secretary clinton never stepped on anybody's toes. she always left it to the president to take the lead on things. so i think that was a sign that she was a team player. i find, charlie, more people from both parties today saying that they thought she did a good job, and that she showed that she has real depth. then you would have found four years ago. >> rose: clearly it enhanced her reputation. >> i think so. >> rose: when you look forward to the service of john kerry, assuming what most people believe the obvious confir
policy board and has served as a senior adviser as recently as 2011 for afghanistan and pakistan to the late richard holbrooke, former munk debater. ladies and gentlemen, dean vali nasser. [applause] when you think of provocative conversation on a big foreign policy challenges of the day, you have to think about our next debater. his flagship global affairs overam on cnn is seen in 200 countries worldwide but he is anything but a talking head on cable tv. he rights a highly respected column for "the washington post" and is the editor-at-large of "time" magazine. his numerous best selling books include "the post-american world" and "the future of freedom." please welcome back to the munk debate stage, broadcaster and journalist, fareed zukaria. we are just moments from getting our debate underway but before we hear from opening statements, once again, i'm going to need this audience's assistance as the night goes on to make sure our debaters stay on time in terms of their opening and closing remarks and that we move forward as a debate together so you will see this countdown clock
three questions. one is afghanistan, the sec is pakistan. with regard to afghanistan, i wanted to ask you about the first question relates to president karzai and the leches ahead of them. when he was here just a couple of weeks ago, i had the chance to visit with him in leader mcconnel's office and a number of senators as well. and to ask him directly about the elections and ask him about my second question. but i wanted to get your sense of where you see those lexes going. what efforts you can undertake to make sure that they are free and fair because they've been, i think, central to the next chapter in this transition. i just wanted to comment on that. the second question as it relates to afghanistan is one that senator boxer raised and her work on this has been exemplary, on women and girls and in particular, i have a -- an amendment that we got through the national defense authorization act which would require both state and defense to file a report on the efforts to promote the security of afghan women and girls just by way of itemization monitoring and responding to changes in
in pakistan. the u.s. war on terror grown reliant on the unmanned vehicles that are prepared for flight an armed with the hell fire missiles. >> i believe john brennan taking over at c.i.a. will ensure that the drone program will comet. the administration has been -- and brennan particular, selling us on the fact that drones is the magic weapon. >> bret: >> reporter: president bam banal herted the drones from the predecessor. despite his criticism of bush, he has empanded the program employing agilities to authorize 300 drone strikes that killed # ,500 people. it has long strangeed relakes with pakistan and civilian who complain about the civilian casualties. >> we endeavor to redouse zillian casualties as much as possible. -- civilian casualties as much as possible. taking the fight to al-qaeda made the united states safer. >> worked to embed evidents to a strong legal frame wok. >> civil bi liberty groups. >> the u.s. government is using drones far from the battlefield to kill people who are not presenting any threat to the united states. that is the under which force used forren the
, and pakistan. every other country in the world we are under the kind of contracting rules i think interfere with our capacity to get the best deal particularly when it comes to security we should in the countries where the threats unfortunately are going to always be with us. should we look to extend that to mali or somalia? >> there was an article i think in one of the newspapers today that went into detail. for more than two decades federal law required the state department to select the cheapest rather than the best contractor to provide local guard services at the embassies abroad. there is that olding you get what you pay for and this lowest-price provision started off in 1990 but it has stayed with us and i would respectfully request this committee take a hard look at it. you cannot do a total lifting of it for everyone look at the high threat posts where obviously we did it for iraq, afghanistan, and pakistan and the countries you made would fall into that category. >> among the various islamic extremist groups operating in africa today, in your view which poses the greatest threat,
, afghanistan, and pakistan. every other country in the world, we are under the kind of contracting rules that i think do interfere with our capacity to get the best deal, particularly when it comes to security that we should in these countries where the threats unfortunately are going to always be with us. >> should we look to extend that to mali and the drc and somalia? >> i would recommend -- there was an article in one of the newspapers that went into detail and here's how it started. for more than two decades, they required the state department to select the cheapest rather than the best contractors for the embassies abroad. you get what you pay for. the provision started in 1990 and stayed with us. i would respectfully request that this submitee take a look at it. you can't do a total lifting of it for everybody, at least look at the high threat posts where we did it for iraq, afghanistan and pack o pakistan and the countries you are naming are countries that i would fall into that category. >> thank you very much. among the various extremist groups operating in africa today, in your view,
. in part because over the last years and in pakistan and iraq and afghanistan and yemen and elsewhere. we rely on proprofessionals to implement the protocols to keep our people safe and as i said i have a lot of confidence in them and most of the time they get it right. i was also engaged and think this is what deputy secretary burns was referring to. in the issues related to the deteriorating threat environment, particularly in libya. we were also watching to try to see what we could do to support the libyan government to improve the overall stability of their country to deal with the many militias. we have many programs and actions we were working on. i had a number of conversations with leading libyan officials. i went to libya in october of 2011 and in fact shortly before the attack on benghazi, we approved libya for substantial funding from a joint dod could for border security ct capabilities and wmd efforts. i wanted to clarify that there were specific instances and assessments going on primarily by the security professionals related to individual posts including benghazi. >> what
and giving. look at pakistan. we gave pakistan $2 billion a year and said to them, here, have this money, find bin laden. what did we do? we are getting -- they were never going to find bin laden. the minute they found him they lost the two million. so the tail shouldn't be wagging the dog when it comes to foreign assistance. >> thank you very much. after the bluster, the bs, the benghazi hearing moving into a debate over security funding. >> the funds provided by congress were enat quit. >> for the past two years ago the also meteorologist's meteorologist's for diplomatic fun has been slashed. >> congress has consistently given less. >> mullins and pickerring says that money was and is in the budget is very important and makes a difference. >> i would ask this committee to work with us. there are holds on the security funding going to libya. >> but the numbers tell a very different story. funding for embassy security in the region has actually been spiking and is expected to remain high. brett, that became the best sort of defense becoming offense. it's all the republicans' fault. >> it
in neighboring afghanistan. but pakistan's military considered him as key to keeping the peace in pakistan. >>> in iraq, more religous violence killed five people there. al-qaeda gunmen killed a police hand and his brother north of baghdad and a car bomb killed two shiite muslims on a pilgrimage to karbala. the government is promising tighter security for those traveling this week. >>> al-jazeera is buying an american cable chaner. the arab news channel is available on some tvs but the deal with current tv gives it a chance to broadcast to more of the country. >>> check this out. you may have a harder time finding 75-watt light bulbs. they are joining the list of incandescent bulbs being phased out for more energy efficient light bulbs. and 40 and 06-watt bulbs will be phased out by -- and 60-watt bulbs will be phased out by 2014. >>> less than a month after the school shooting in connecticut, survivors returned to class today. >> first, aid delayed. there is a crucial issue for the congress today. we are back in a moment with the details.  . >>> welcome back to fox 5 mo
libya and egypt and syria and pakistan. we are talking about a world that is changing and is less responsive to u.s. pressure and u.s. military power and diplomacy. that changes something that chuck hagel is aware of and he has well-formed views on. at the heart of that view is that power should be diffused away from the american military and plates and other power centers around the world and that idea itself is controversial. president obama agrees with that and many in congress do not. host: the former senator gave an interview with his former state paper, "the lincoln journal star" he said his critics have distorted his views. guest: it is unusual for a to give any interviews at all but he has faced a much criticism that he wanted to get one opening salvo out there and that is what he did. he basically said that he will have a chance to correct the record during his confirmation hearing. we should note from that interview that he is not backing down from any of his positions. he is not saying he no longer believes in the things that he believed in that were so controversial. h
served as a senior advisor as recently as 2011 for afghanistan and pakistan to the late richard holbrook, a former munk debater. ladies and gentlemen, dean vali nasser. [applause] now, when you think of provocative conversation on a big foreign policy challenges of the day, you have to think about our next debater. his flagship global affairs program on cnn is seen in over 200 countries worldwide. but he is anything but a talking head on cable tv. he writes a highly respected column for the post and is the editor at large of "time" magazine. his numerous best selling books include "the post-american world" and "the future of freedom." please welcome back broadcaster and journalist, fareed zakaria. [applause] now we are just momenting from getting our debate under way but before we hear from opening statements, one again i'm going to need this audience's assistance as the night goes on to make sure our debaters stay on time in terms of their opening and closing remarks and that we move forward as a debate together. so you will see this countdown clock, this handy clock appear. when it rea
and pakistan. ladies and gentlemen, dean vali nasr. [cheers and applause] now, when you think of provocative conversation on the big foreign policy challenge of the day you have to think about our next debater. his program on cnn is seen in over 200 countries worldwide but he's anything but a talking head on tv. he writes a column for "the washington post" and is the edit or "time" magazine. please welcome back to the munk debate stage journalist fareed zakaria. [cheers and applause] now we're moments from getting our debate under way but before we hear opening statements, once again, i need this audience assist answer to make sure our debaters stay on time in terms of their opening and closing remark and we move forward as a debate together. so you will see this countdown clock, this clock appear. when it reaches zero applaud. this will let our debaters know that their time is over for their opening and closing statements. before we kick off the debate let's see how the 3,000 people gathered today voted on our resolution that the world cannot tolerate iran with nuclear weapons. let's see t
. he was advisor to four presidents, president obama asked him to lead his afghanistan-pakistan policy review in early 2009 and he did that for a couple of months before happily, for us, returning to brookings. bruce has written already two books in the time he's been here, actually a third is about to come out, i'll mention that in just a second, but the first two were about al qaeda and then about the u.s.-pakistan relationship "the deadly embrace." . his new book, coming out next month is "avoiding armageddon" and it's the story about the u.s.-india-pakistan relationship and crisis management over the last half century or so. general stan mcchrystal is a 1976 graduate of west point. spent 34 years in the u.s. army. retiring as a four-star general in the summer of 2010. he has been commander in afghanistan. he was the director of the joint staff. but perhaps in military circles, most of all, as i mentioned, this five-year period at joint special operations command makes him memorable and historic. general casey at his retirement ceremony in 2010 said that the reality is that stan has
at the instability in pakistan. this is a real danger we have to think about in the future. if we ignore them, that is a prescription for getting more americans killed. host: i want to get your reaction to what the secretary of state had to say yes today. here's what she had to say. [video clip] guest: i think you would hear the same from the intelligence community or dod. the work that was done in afghanistan and pakistan, they have taken out a whole cadre of leadership. people have migrated back to other parts of the world who are affiliates, part of the jihad syndicate. they are extremists and have designs on overthrowing existing governments, control and territory. there has been the decimation of al qaeda in the afghanistan- pakistan region, we have to contend with the wannabes and the affiliate's going forward. host: any reaction? guest: there has been a loss of capacity on the part of al qaeda central and pakistan. because osama bin laden is dead, that doesn't mean allocate it is dead -- it does mean al qaeda is dead. they are very much alive. they have migrated. they are now seeing a
public and successful diplomatic interventions in afghanistan, pakistan and sudan. i think one day historians will judge his senate years in temperatures terms of his impact on foreign policy much the same way so many recognize senator ted kennedy's impact on domestic policy. from his many years in the u.s. senate, john has developed a very personal understanding that we represent not just states or government but also people. i once asked john why he loves the senate. he said, it's the pride he feels in trying to get things done for people. for three years now, he's been working quietly to help a father from newton, massachusetts, colin bauer, whose two sons were kidnapped and taken to egypt. john even called former president mubarak and had a screaming match with him about it. five times he's been to egypt since then and every time colin has been at the top of his list in every meeting. every senator here has a colin bauer. it's what we do. we fight for people back home. as secretary, john will understand that and bend over backwards to help us do that. he will be a terrific brid
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 159 (some duplicates have been removed)